Image of a violin, the 1902 Enrico Rocca violin

1902 Enrico Rocca violin

Enrico Rocca made this violin in 1902 at the zenith of his career. Rocca was born in Turin in 1847, and later lived and worked in Genoa. He studied with his father Giuseppe, who died in 1865 when Enrico was 17. Rocca’s early violin models are nearly identical to his father’s final Stradivari model, that of the ‘Messiah.’ He also finished some of his father’s instruments following the latter’s death, but struggled to establish himself as a maker and instead worked as a carpenter and day laborer in Genoa's shipyards. He finally returned to violin making some fifteen years later, and opened his own workshop in 1880.

The instrument’s two-piece back displays lovely irregular figure, descending from the centre joint. The ribs and scroll are of matching material. The two-piece top is of narrow grain, widening slightly at the flanks. The varnish of light orange-brown over amber displays craquelure throughout. The maker has blackened the chamfers of the scroll and rib corners.

Listen to the 1902 Enrico Rocca violin

 

Past winners:

2000 - 2003 Julie-Anne Derome (Montréal, Québec)
2003 - 2006 Kerry DuWors (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan)
2006 - 2009 Caroline Chéhadé (New York, New York)
2009 - 2012 Jing Wang (Houston, Texas)
2012 - 2015 Kerry DuWors (Brandon, Manitoba)
2015 - 2018 Jeremy James Potts

Instruments and current winners

The Power of a Donation

The Canada Council’s Musical Instrument Bank consists of exceptional instruments donated or loaned by both individuals and foundations. These contributions empower the next generation of Canada’s major classical musicians to further their creative development and reach a new level in their careers, while also giving audiences around the world the opportunity to hear remarkable instruments at play.

Violinist Byungchan (Chan) Lee

"The opportunity to borrow an exceptional instrument at this fundamentally important and transitional time in my career has helped me find my own artistic voice."

— Byungchan Lee, 2015 and 2018 #InstrumentBank winner —